Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Belinda Archibong

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Professor Belinda Archibong, Barnard College, Columbia University
“Where Local Kings Rule: Long-Term Impacts of Precolonial Institutions and Geography on Access to Public Infrastructure Services in Nigeria”

Abstract:

Although previous works have discussed the benefits of precolonial centralization for development in Africa, the findings and the mechanisms provided do not explain the heterogeneity in access to public services of formerly centralized states. Using new survey data from Nigeria, I find a significant negative effect of centralization on access to certain public services in centralized regions whose leaders failed to comply with the autocratic federal regime, and whose jurisdictions were subsequently punished by under investment in these services, with lasting impacts till today. The results are robust to extensive controls and instrumenting for precolonial centralization with an ecological diversity index.

Paper available here.

Date: Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Juliana Freire

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Juliana Freire, New York University
“Data Polygamy: The Many-Many Relationships among Urban Spatio-Temporal Data Sets” (joint work with Fernando Chirigati, Harish Doraiswamy and Theodoros Damoulas)

Abstract:

The increasing ability to collect data from urban environments, coupled with a push towards openness by governments, has resulted in the availability of numerous spatio-temporal datasets covering diverse aspects of a city.
Discovering relationships between these data sets can produce new insights by enabling domain experts to not only test but also generate hypotheses. However, discovering these relationships is difficult. First, a relationship between two data sets may occur only at certain locations and/or time periods. Second, the sheer number and size of the data sets, coupled with the diverse spatial and temporal scales at which the data is available, presents computational challenges on all fronts, from indexing and querying to analyzing them. Finally, it is nontrivial to differentiate between meaningful and spurious relationships.
To address these challenges, we propose Data Polygamy, a scalable topology-based framework that allows users to query for statistically significant relationships between spatio-temporal data sets. We have performed an experimental evaluation using over 300 spatial-temporal urban data sets which shows that our approach is scalable and effective at identifying interesting relationships.

Paper available here.
Author’s website here.

Date: Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Patricia Gomez-Gonzalez

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Patricia Gomez-Gonzalez, Fordham University
“Same Spain, Less Pain?” (joint work with Daniel M. Rees Federal Reserve Bank of Australia)

Abstract:

 We explore how the Spanish economy would have performed in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis if it had retained an independent monetary policy rather than joining the euro. A novel aspect of our approach is that we set up and estimate a structural model that takes account of the break in the conduct of monetary policy that occurred when Spain joined the euro, including anticipation effects. On average, Spanish economic growth would have been around 1.5 percentage points higher and consumption growth 0.5 percentage points higher between 2008 and 2014 if Spain had retained an independent monetary policy. But because euro entry led to a large boom prior to the crisis, the level of economic activity would have been similar by late 2014, regardless of Spain’s monetary arrangements.

Paper available here.

 Date: Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Next Tuesday at the GC: Economic Policy

Don’t miss the following event of the series “The First 100 Days.” Presented with the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality and the Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC).

Description:
The stock market surged soon after since President Trump’s election, but much remains uncertain about his economic plan. Will his proposed combination of tax cuts, spending cuts, and infrastructure investment produce long-term growth or a new recession? Kathleen Hays, global economics and policy editor at Bloomberg, moderates a panel of experts from across the political spectrum to break down the unknowns and the realities of “Trumponomics.”

PANELISTS:

Paul Krugman, Nobel Prize-winning economist, New York Times columnist, and distinguished professor at the Graduate Center.

Jason Furman, senior fellow at Peterson Institute of International Economics and former chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers.

Dan Alpert, managing partner of Westwood Capital, fellow at the Century Foundation, and author of The Age of Oversupply.

James Pethokoukis, CNBC contributor, columnist and blogger at the American Enterprise Institute, and former Washington columnist for Reuters.

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

C200: Proshansky Auditorium

WHEN:

February 21, 2016: 6:30 PM

ADMISSION:

Free; Reservations Required (Make your reservation here.)

SPONSOR:

Public Programs

This event will be live-streamed.

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Michael Fabricant and Stephen Brier

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Professors Michael Fabricant and Stephen Brier, Graduate Center, CUNY
“Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education”

The discussion will be based on their published book: https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/content/austerity-blues

Overview:
Public higher education in the postwar era was a key economic and social driver in American life, making college available to millions of working men and women. Since the 1980s, however, government austerity policies and politics have severely reduced public investment in higher education, exacerbating inequality among poor and working-class students of color, as well as part-time faculty. In Austerity Blues, Michael Fabricant and Stephen Brier examine these devastating fiscal retrenchments nationally, focusing closely on New York and California, both of which were leaders in the historic expansion of public higher education in the postwar years and now are at the forefront of austerity measures.

Fabricant and Brier describe the extraordinary growth of public higher education after 1945, thanks largely to state investment, the alternative intellectual and political traditions that defined the 1960s, and the social and economic forces that produced austerity policies and inequality beginning in the late 1970s and 1980s. A provocative indictment of the negative impact neoliberal policies have visited on the public university, especially the growth of class, racial, and gender inequalities, Austerity Blues also analyzes the many changes currently sweeping public higher education, including the growing use of educational technology, online learning, and privatization, while exploring how these developments hurt students and teachers. In its final section, the book offers examples of oppositional and emancipatory struggles and practices that can help reimagine public higher education in the future.

The ways in which factors as diverse as online learning, privatization, and disinvestment cohere into a single powerful force driving deepening inequality is the central theme of the book. Incorporating the differing perspectives of students, faculty members, and administrators, the book reveals how public education has been redefined as a private benefit, often outsourced to for-profit vendors who “sell” education back to indebted undergraduates. Over the past twenty years, tuition and related student debt have climbed precipitously and degree completion rates have dropped. Not only has this new austerity threatened public universities’ ability to educate students, Fabricant and Brier argue, but it also threatens to undermine the very meaning and purpose of public higher education in offering poor and working-class students access to a quality education in a democracy. Synthesizing historical sources, social science research, and contemporary reportage, Austerity Blues will be of interest to readers concerned about rising inequality and the decline of public higher education.

Date: Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Xiye Yang

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Xiye Yang, Department of Economics, Rutgers University, New Brunswick
“Jump Contagion in Financial Markets”

The talk will be based on two of his co-authored papers:
Testing for mutually exciting jumps and financial flights in high frequency data (link to paper)
And Testing for Self-Excitation in Jumps (link to the paper).

Date: Monday, February 6, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Next monday at the GC: HIGHER EDUCATION AND UPWARD MOBILITY

Don’t miss the following event presented with the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality:

Description:
Which U.S. colleges best help children climb the income ladder? How can we increase access to such colleges for children from low-income families? Economist Raj Chetty takes on these questions in a bold new study, pointing to public higher education as a key agent of change: CUNY alone propels almost six times as many low-income students into the middle class and beyond as all eight Ivy League campuses combined. Chetty joins the GC’s Presidential Professor Philip Kasinitz (Sociology); Presidential Professor Leslie McCall (Sociology and Political Science), associate director of the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality; and moderator David Leonhardt of The New York Times, with opening remarks by Chancellor James B. Milliken.

Read David Leonhardt: “America’s Great Working-Class Colleges” (NEW YORK TIMES 1/18/17)

Read David Leonhardt: “Budget Cuts That Are Un-American” (NEW YORK TIMES 1/19/17)

Read THE UPSHOT: “Some Colleges Have More Students from the Top 1 Percent Than the Bottom 60” (NEW YORK TIMES 1/18/17)

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

C200: Proshansky Auditorium

WHEN:

December 05, 2016: 6:30 PM

ADMISSION:

Free; Reservations Required (Make your reservation here.)

SPONSOR:

Public Programs

Next Monday at the GC: IS FINANCIAL REFORM WORKING? BARNEY FRANK AND PAUL KRUGMAN IN CONVERSATION

Reservations are full; this event will be LIVE-STREAMED.

With the nation in financial crisis, U.S. Representative Barney Frank (D-MA) was a leading co-sponsor of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act, the biggest overhaul of the financial regulatory system since the Great Depression. What have the reforms accomplished, and what can be done now? He speaks with Paul Krugman, Nobel Prize-winning economist, New York Times columnist, and distinguished professor in the Ph.D. Program in Economics at the Graduate Center.

Presented with the James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality.

WHERE:
The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:
C200: Proshansky Auditorium

WHEN:
December 05, 2016: 6:30 PM

CONTACT INFO:
http://www.gc.cuny.edu/publicprograms

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Anna Arakelyan

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor David A. Jaeger.

A lecture by: Anna Arakelyan, CUNY Graduate Center
“Who Influences Your Wealth? The Effect of Culture and Ethnic Origin, Neighborhood and Peers on Personal Income: Spatial Econometric Analysis of New York City”

Abstract of the paper:

Being a “social animal”, each person is inherently embedded into a complex structure of social relations. He has role models to aspire to, conformity rules to follow, and expectations to meet. This paper aims to find what the different social influences each person experiences in life are. Specifically, I consider how a person’s ethnic community, age reference group, occupational and industry group peers, and residential area neighbors affect his total income. I introduce a novel model of multiple social networks and discuss various identification implications. I apply the model empirically to New York City, which naturally is a very favorable environment to test for multiple social effects. The study uses generous person-level American Community Survey data that covers rich geographic, ethnic, demographic, and employment characteristics. The sample used is made of five pooled cross-sections, resulting in about 270,000 observations. I analyze a model with spatial lags in dependent variable (SAR), a model with spatial lags in disturbance term (SEM), and a model with spatial lags in both dependent variable and error (SAC). I find highly significant effects for various specifications and elaborate on many aspects of the multiple social effects model.

Author’s website: http://arakelyanag.wixsite.com/vita

Date: Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5382

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

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