All posts by Ercio

Thursday at the GC: After Piketty

This Thursday, May 11, 6:30 pm at the GC:

Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty is the most widely discussed work of economics in recent history. (Piketty gave a major talk at the Graduate Center upon its release in 2014.) But are its insights about inequality and economic growth on target? And how should researchers explore the ideas Piketty pushed to the forefront? These questions and more are tackled in the new book After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality, which is sure to spark much debate in its own right. Contributors join in a conversation to celebrate its release and discuss how lessons from Piketty can help us understand the current economic and political moment.

PANELISTS:

Heather Boushey, executive director and chief economist at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth and author of Finding Time: The Economics of Work-Life Conflict.

Paul Krugman, Nobel Prize-winning economist; New York Timescolumnist; and distinguished professor at the Graduate Center.

Branko Milanovic, GC visiting presidential professor and senior scholar at the Stone Center; former lead economist in the World Bank’s research department; and author of Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization.

Suresh Naidu, assistant professor of economics and public affairs at Columbia University.

Presented with the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality and the Washington Center for Equitable Growth.

 

 

 

 

Reservations are full but you can watch the event live! at: STREAM PAGE

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Tzuhao Huang

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Tzuhao Huang, PhD Program Economics, The Graduate Center (CUNY)
“Using Money Signals to Improve Taylor Rule Performance in the New Keynesian Model”

Paper available here.

Date: Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Today at the GC: Trade, Jobs, and Inequality

Wednesday, April 26, 6:30 pm
Trade, Jobs, and Inequality
Moderated by Eduardo Porter

President Trump has promised to follow two simple rules: “Made in America. Made by Americans.” Will the administration’s trade agenda result in more US manufacturing jobs? And how will it impact wages and income disparity, in our country and globally? New York Times columnist Eduardo Porter (Economic Scene) hosts a panel of experts on the complex interrelationship between trade, jobs, and inequality.

PANELISTS:

Paul Krugman, Nobel Prize-winning economist, New York Times columnist, and GC distinguished professor of economics and senior scholar at the Stone Center.

David Autor, leading labor economist; professor at MIT, where he directs the School Effectiveness and Inequality Initiative; and editor in chief of the Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Brad DeLong, economics professor at U.C. Berkeley; weblogger for the Washington Center for Equitable Growth; and former U.S. deputy assistant secretary of the treasury, in the Clinton administration.

Anne Harrison, professor at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania; former director of development policy at the World Bank; and author of Globalization and Poverty.

Part of the series “The First 100 Days.” Presented with the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality and the Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC).

Reservations are full but you can watch the event live! GC LIVE STREAM PAGE

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Elena Goldman

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Elena Goldman, Pace University
“Bayesian Analysis of Systemic Risk”

Paper available here shortly.
Author’s webpage.

Date: Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Judit Temesvary, Board of Governors, DC

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Judit Temesvary, Board of Governors, DC
“The Currency Dimension of the Bank Lending Channel in International Monetary Transmission”
(joint paper with Elöd Takáts)

Abstract:
We investigate how the use of a currency transmits monetary policy shocks in the global banking system. We use newly available unique data on the bilateral cross-border lending flows of 27 BIS-reporting lending banking systems to over 50 borrowing countries, broken down by currency denomination (USD, EUR and JPY). We have three main findings. First, monetary shocks in a currency significantly affect cross-border lending flows in that currency, even when neither the lending banking system nor the borrowing country uses that currency as their own. Second, this transmission works mainly through lending to non-banks. Third, this currency dimension of the bank lending channel works similarly across the three currencies suggesting that the cross-border bank lending channel of liquidity shock transmission may not be unique to lending in USD.

Paper available here.

Date: Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Belinda Archibong

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Professor Belinda Archibong, Barnard College, Columbia University
“Where Local Kings Rule: Long-Term Impacts of Precolonial Institutions and Geography on Access to Public Infrastructure Services in Nigeria”

Abstract:

Although previous works have discussed the benefits of precolonial centralization for development in Africa, the findings and the mechanisms provided do not explain the heterogeneity in access to public services of formerly centralized states. Using new survey data from Nigeria, I find a significant negative effect of centralization on access to certain public services in centralized regions whose leaders failed to comply with the autocratic federal regime, and whose jurisdictions were subsequently punished by under investment in these services, with lasting impacts till today. The results are robust to extensive controls and instrumenting for precolonial centralization with an ecological diversity index.

Paper available here.

Date: Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Juliana Freire

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Juliana Freire, New York University
“Data Polygamy: The Many-Many Relationships among Urban Spatio-Temporal Data Sets” (joint work with Fernando Chirigati, Harish Doraiswamy and Theodoros Damoulas)

Abstract:

The increasing ability to collect data from urban environments, coupled with a push towards openness by governments, has resulted in the availability of numerous spatio-temporal datasets covering diverse aspects of a city.
Discovering relationships between these data sets can produce new insights by enabling domain experts to not only test but also generate hypotheses. However, discovering these relationships is difficult. First, a relationship between two data sets may occur only at certain locations and/or time periods. Second, the sheer number and size of the data sets, coupled with the diverse spatial and temporal scales at which the data is available, presents computational challenges on all fronts, from indexing and querying to analyzing them. Finally, it is nontrivial to differentiate between meaningful and spurious relationships.
To address these challenges, we propose Data Polygamy, a scalable topology-based framework that allows users to query for statistically significant relationships between spatio-temporal data sets. We have performed an experimental evaluation using over 300 spatial-temporal urban data sets which shows that our approach is scalable and effective at identifying interesting relationships.

Paper available here.
Author’s website here.

Date: Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center: Patricia Gomez-Gonzalez

Join us in our upcoming Applied Economics Seminar at the Graduate Center organized by Professor Agbeyegbe, Hunter College & Graduate Center.

A lecture by:
Patricia Gomez-Gonzalez, Fordham University
“Same Spain, Less Pain?” (joint work with Daniel M. Rees Federal Reserve Bank of Australia)

Abstract:

 We explore how the Spanish economy would have performed in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis if it had retained an independent monetary policy rather than joining the euro. A novel aspect of our approach is that we set up and estimate a structural model that takes account of the break in the conduct of monetary policy that occurred when Spain joined the euro, including anticipation effects. On average, Spanish economic growth would have been around 1.5 percentage points higher and consumption growth 0.5 percentage points higher between 2008 and 2014 if Spain had retained an independent monetary policy. But because euro entry led to a large boom prior to the crisis, the level of economic activity would have been similar by late 2014, regardless of Spain’s monetary arrangements.

Paper available here.

 Date: Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Time: 12:00pm-1:45pm

Location: 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

Room: 5383

Travel Directions to The Graduate Center:
By Subway: B, D, F, N, R, or Q to 34th Street-Herald Square; walk east to 5th Avenue 6 to 33rd Street.
By Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, M16, M34, Q32.

Next Tuesday at the GC: Economic Policy

Don’t miss the following event of the series “The First 100 Days.” Presented with the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality and the Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC).

Description:
The stock market surged soon after since President Trump’s election, but much remains uncertain about his economic plan. Will his proposed combination of tax cuts, spending cuts, and infrastructure investment produce long-term growth or a new recession? Kathleen Hays, global economics and policy editor at Bloomberg, moderates a panel of experts from across the political spectrum to break down the unknowns and the realities of “Trumponomics.”

PANELISTS:

Paul Krugman, Nobel Prize-winning economist, New York Times columnist, and distinguished professor at the Graduate Center.

Jason Furman, senior fellow at Peterson Institute of International Economics and former chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers.

Dan Alpert, managing partner of Westwood Capital, fellow at the Century Foundation, and author of The Age of Oversupply.

James Pethokoukis, CNBC contributor, columnist and blogger at the American Enterprise Institute, and former Washington columnist for Reuters.

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

C200: Proshansky Auditorium

WHEN:

February 21, 2016: 6:30 PM

ADMISSION:

Free; Reservations Required (Make your reservation here.)

SPONSOR:

Public Programs

This event will be live-streamed.